Conjunctive adverbs

Conjunctive adverbs are used to connect or link two independent clauses to form compound and mixed sentences . They are like conjunctions; but, conjunctions are used to join two words, phrases, and clauses. The selection of conjunctive adverbs depends on the relationship between two independent clauses.

Conjunctive adverbs examples

•Consequently  •As a result •Equally   •Likewise •Conversely  •However

•In addition  •besides •furthermore  •Moreover •Hence •Therefore

•Similarly  •Nevertheless •Nonetheless  •Rather

•On the other hand  •Further •Also.

Let’s see the use of conjunctive adverbs in sentences.

Independent clause + semicolon + conjunctive adverb + independent clause.

•It was raining heavily, therefore, humpires called off the game.

•They were not ready to compromise anymore; as a result, the deal was canceled.

•The intensity of natural disasters has been increasing continuously. Hence, G-8 members have decided to focus on green technology.

•In India, cotton is widely known as white gold; likewise, in Bangladesh, jute cultivation is a popular occupation.

•Nowadays, the living cost in the urban areas are growing continuously; similarly, in rural areas people are facing difficulty to get employed.

•He earns his bread and butter by selling newspapers; likewise, his sister works as a waitress.

•Bob wants to be a cricket player; comparatively, his brother, Tom aspires to be a football player.

•Smith scored a hundred in first inning; equally, Warner played a match winning knock.

•If go to visit to the Red Fort, there you must not forget to visit India Gate; in addition, you can visit Lotus temple in Delhi.

•I would like to swim in the river; besides, I swim in the tanks.

•Police warned the demonstrating mob; furthermore, they used tear gases to dispel public .

•His first choice is to apply for journalism; also, he can choose law.

•Working with NGOs is a big challenge; moreover, you cannot expect better facility.

•It was too late; nevertheless, we reached at the hotel by midnight.

•He is so weak in math; indeed, he even fail to recall simple formulas.

•They must work hard; otherwise, others will defeat them.

Conjunctive adverbs for contrast

To show the contrast between two independent clauses, you can use –

•However  •In contrast •Nevertheless •Instead, etc.

•It was too late; nevertheless, we reached at the hotel by midnight.

•He was leading in the first round; however, he gave up in second time.

Conjunctive adverbs for comparison

In order to add extra information of equal value to the main clause, you can use-

•In addition  •Besides  •Also •Furthermore •Likewise  •Comparatively •Equally etc.

•In India, cotton is widely known as white gold; likewise, in Bangladesh, jute cultivation is a popular occupation.

•He earns his bread and butter by selling newspapers; likewise, his sister works as a waitress.

•Bob wants to be a cricket player; comparatively, his brother, Tom aspires to be a football player.

•Smith scored a hundred in first inning; equally, Warner played a match winning knock.

•If go to visit to the Red Fort, there you must not forget to visit India Gate; in addition, you can visit Lotus temple in Delhi.

•I would like to swim in the river; besides, I swim in the tanks.

•Police warned the demonstrating mob; furthermore, they used tear gases to dispel public .

•His first choice is to apply for journalism; also, he can choose law.

Conjunctive adverbs to join results

•It was raining heavily, therefore, humpires called off the game.

•They were not ready to compromise anymore; as a result, the deal was canceled.

•The intensity of natural disasters has been increasing continuously. Hence, G-8 members have decided to focus on green technology.

For condition and emphasis

•They must work hard; otherwise, others will defeat them.

•They must work hard; otherwise, others will defeat them.

Conjunctive adverbs can be placed in the middle of the two independent clauses or in the beginning of the main clause as per the requirement of the sentence.

Transitive and intransitive verbs

Understanding adjective clause

Learning adverb clause of time

Subordinating clause by when and while

Correct use of “but” and “yet”

Use of not only & but also as conjunction.

As soon as conjunction of time

Trade war disadvantages for consumers.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTkyAZY15L6UOEUl3y85XYw/